Nationality of Milgrim?

Hi to all on the board. I was just wondering...

Can anyone confirm Milgrim's nationality? I've just re-read SC, maybe I missed something, but is his actual nationality ever mentioned?

He feels like a non-US citizen to me, but maybe that's just my perception of the character.
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by ECS:
Hi to all on the board. I was just wondering...

Can anyone confirm Milgrim's nationality? I've just re-read SC, maybe I missed something, but is his actual nationality ever mentioned?

He feels like a non-US citizen to me, but maybe that's just my perception of the character.


He certainly seems to have a highly-educated liberal type slant to his personality but he seems pretty classically American to me.

Otherwise: British? Canadian? Given he's a native English speaker those seem like the only other suitable options.

Welcome to the WGB. :-)
Always go to the source:

quote:

Chapter 55 - Phantom Gun Syndrome
Miller,” said Brown, from his enormous white leather recliner, across ten feet of off-white shag carpet. “Your name is David Miller. Same birthday, same age, same place of birth.”

They were in a Gulfstream jet on a runway at Ronald Reagan. Milgrim had his own white leather recliner. He hadn’t been to this airport since it had been National. Across a bridge from Georgetown. He knew this was a Gulfstream because there was an elaborately engraved brass plate that said “Gulfstream II” on the high-gloss wooden surround of the window beside his chair. Bird’s-eye maple, he thought, but too shiny, like the trim in a limo that was really trying. There was a lot of that in this cabin. And a lot of white leather, polished brass, and off-white shag. “David Miller,” he repeated.

“You live in New York. You’re a translator. Russian.”

“I’m Russian?”

“Your passport,” said Brown, holding one up, navy blue with pale gold trim, “is American. David Miller. David Miller is not a junkie. David Miller, upon entering Canada, will neither be in possession of nor under the influence of drugs.” He checked his watch. He was wearing the gray suit and a white shirt again. “How many of those pills are you holding?”


Milgrim is born the same place as David Miller, the fictive owner of the fake American passport Milgrim is forced to use for his journey to Canada. If said David Miller was born anywhere other than the US, I'm sure it would have been mentioned.

Thus my conclusion - American
Thanks for your responses so far, but a couple of things are still bugging me.

I don't have the book to hand, but doesn't Brown tell Milgrim to keep schtum on the plane to Canada? Would you have to be American to work a fake US passport?

Also, there was something in the first third of the book about thinking in a kind of Argentinian cadence (this may have been Tito though now I come to think of it!!).

I don't know; maybe it's the fact he's reading Cohn and he's so diametrically opposed to Brown's uptight American, but I keep imagining Milgrim as a narced-up European.
quote:
Originally posted by ECS:
Thanks for your responses so far, but a couple of things are still bugging me.

I don't have the book to hand, but doesn't Brown tell Milgrim to keep schtum on the plane to Canada? Would you have to be American to work a fake US passport?

Also, there was something in the first third of the book about thinking in a kind of Argentinian cadence (this may have been Tito though now I come to think of it!!).

I don't know; maybe it's the fact he's reading Cohn and he's so diametrically opposed to Brown's uptight American, but I keep imagining Milgrim as a narced-up European.


1) The Argentinean thing, which I didn't note, would have to do more with Bill being into Borges and maybe reading him again around the time of writing it. Personally, I suspect you are imposing this template yourself.

2)What the fuck is schtumm? To keep quiet?
Shtummmm... Big Grin

Thanks for the responses, I'm just trying to get some opinions on it, rather than it being a fixed idea; as Gibson is part of my thesis, and part of that thesis is on ambiguity, technology, and the transnational.

Interesting that most envision him as American though...
quote:
Originally posted by ECS:
Shtummmm... Big Grin

Thanks for the responses, I'm just trying to get some opinions on it, rather than it being a fixed idea; as Gibson is part of my thesis, and part of that thesis is on ambiguity, technology, and the transnational.

Interesting that most envision him as American though...


I don't think it is an opinion type thing.
quote:
Originally posted by UberDog:
He is American, Bill said the name was picked becuase it was once fairly common in the South.


Our esteemed proprietor always picks the right name. This one I like for it's echoes of 'pilgrim' and 'milligram', which is apt for the character, whatever nationality.

I'd like to know how Inchmale bubbled to the top of his sub-concious though.
quote:
Originally posted by UberDog:
Me too.


When you first hear/read it you might think along the lines of 'impotent', but as the character develops it sort of turns into 'not macho' or maybe 'traditional'. The information that he has a club (and one has a club even if one is only a member) sort of reinforces the 'traditional' idea.
Inchmale--
To me, it is simply a name that intrigues, that is different (***goes to google***) and elegant (sort of English in a way)

I agree about the connotations of Milgrim, BK

Edit: Doesn't exist! My bet is he was googling electronics and saw this:
"Compare Hosa YPR102 Stereo Quarter Inch Male to Dual RCA Female Y ." kind of thing...
quote:
Originally posted by Aisha:
Inchmale--

Edit: Doesn't exist! My bet is he was googling electronics and saw this:
"Compare Hosa YPR102 Stereo Quarter Inch Male to Dual RCA Female Y ." kind of thing...


Well, you certainly get the feeling that he would have been the one that chose the band's PA.

Reg(inald) is interesting as well as it's a name from my parent's generation. If you said that somebody was called 'Reg' most British people would probably think of a pensioner.

I don't know how old the Toronto model-maker is though.
quote:
Originally posted by BK/DK:
quote:
Originally posted by UberDog:
Me too.


When you first hear/read it you might think along the lines of 'impotent', but as the character develops it sort of turns into 'not macho' or maybe 'traditional'. The information that he has a club (and one has a club even if one is only a member) sort of reinforces the 'traditional' idea.


I think the name relates subconsciously to the Pete Townshend proboscis he keeps saying English rocker-guitarists have.

Those are shcnozzes that look like big Willys.

Plus, there is the "willy" reference.

Odds are it's a reference to someone he knows as he has mentioned this is where many of his names come from and might be embarrassing to said person.
So, let me get this straight. Even though Gib SAYS he picked it as a name he remembered from the South (which indeed has the weirdest names per capita of the continental States, names like Clayton Scarborough Duvall), we are arguing what *his* subconscious promptings were in doing so?

Another !WIN! for Freudianism!

Poston le Carde, Columbia Bugle

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×