Idoru is here now.

Hatsune Miku is the brainchild of Crypton Future Media. They developed the female character to put a face on its singing synthesizer application referred to as a vocaloid. In the same manner as Idoru she's now able to perform on stage in the form of a holographic avatar in front of thousands of groupies.
Personally I found it chilling to see the video and realize the similarities with Mr.Gibsons utopia this first day of 2011. Possibly these news might have been posted earlier, but it's always worth another thought.
Some things from the pen of the prophet's still in the future and some are here. Do you guys think that these imaginary stars will take over stages around the world, or is it just another 'fling'?

Article from Geek.com

 
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I think this has been discussed here before, which may be why you haven't had any replies, but I think that until she is able to have a sex tape released nobody is really going to care about her.
 
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Hatsune Miku was mentioned in November by the man himself, on Twitter.

More interesting than the "virtual star" aspect of it is the way the character and the music was apparently driven by the fans, not by any production company. (The character modeling software was produced by a company, but with no intention, I believe, of this sort of use.)

Honestly, I think she's pretty bland, or maybe just not to my tastes. She's by the people, for the people, where by "people" you mean people who would willingly watch eight hours of, say, まもって守護月天! at a stretch.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by editengine:
I think this has been discussed here before, which may be why you haven't had any replies, but I think that until she is able to have a sex tape released nobody is really going to care about her.


Goddamn right. Show us em boobies.
 
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Yeha, I think the thing that was most disarming about Rei was her humanity, including her human appearance.

A lifesize cartoon isn't going to cut it.

'Cause there's no bewbs like real bewbs.
 
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this is just a scratch of the surface.

ageless idols who will not end up strung out or in jail because of a few unstrategic decesions will quickly replace the troublesome human kind of pop star as soon as the market will allow the temp agencies that create groups like menudo, backstreet, bieber to replace their "talent" pool with robots and software that can be shipped instead of toured, stored instead of boreded, updated instead of put out to pasture.

Popularity of comic characters like the simpsons was the first step (they dont age, their sense of humor stays contemporary to the audience) Hatsune is the next step.
 
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quote:
there's no bewbs like real bewbs
 
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Add some AR and you can be just like Rydell, hanging out with a mini-idoru on your desk.

(People seem to be caring, sex-tape or not...)

 
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Hatsune Miku is not "Idoru" in the sense that she's not provided by a real & strong AI.

The achievement of projecting her 3D in largely uncontrolled environment is impressive. But it's related only to graphics processing and 3D technologies (btw they use mirrors, it's not holography).

There've been a lot of research regarding to the use of autonomous intelligent agents in virtual worlds and progress in this area is notable. I have a Mendeley repository (academic papers and books) on the subject... if someone's interested I can provide invitations.
 
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Yeah the projection part is interesting, how we associated it with a futuristic 'hologram' when in fact it's one of the oldest special effects in theater ('ghosts' in Victorian theater used a similar technique). You can see the crowd reflected in the glass used in her projection in the vid, too.

We don't even know if this is 'live' in the sense of whether or not she is running a pre-programmed routine.

What we are seeing with the concert projection and the AR is the early stages of infrastructure that could be used for an idoru more along the lines of Rei Toei.

However when it comes to a comparison between a performance of Hatsune Miku and a 'real' idoru/idol she is about as real or independent as the human ones. Decisions on everything are not made by the performer, and everything is as pre-scripted as possible.

The odd thing for me with Rei Toei, was that she had any AI at all. When it comes to media idols, intelligence is not something the industry seems to want in the human versions.

(PS, has the Turing Test been passed yet?)
 
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quote:
Originally posted by seven-seven:
[...]
The odd thing for me with Rei Toei, was that she had any AI at all. When it comes to media idols, intelligence is not something the industry seems to want in the human versions.

(PS, has the Turing Test been passed yet?)

Not that I know of, but here's something from the Hacker Test;

0107 Have you ever seen voice mail?
0108 ... Can you read it?
 
0109 Do you solve word puzzles with an on-line dictionary?
 
0110 Have you ever taken a Turing test?
0111 ... Did you fail?

[You get extra points for failing, btw.]



Cheers,

Patrick.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by seven-seven:
Yeah the projection part is interesting, how we associated it with a futuristic 'hologram' when in fact it's one of the oldest special effects in theater ('ghosts' in Victorian theater used a similar technique). You can see the crowd reflected in the glass used in her projection in the vid, too.


Yes. Same trick was used in theaters to provide ubiquity. The impressive thing about this implementation of it is that it's quite undisturbed by external light (like flashes popping). But looking at the mirror you'll clearly see projector spots (bright dots) and those are the only with enough power to "cross" the image. I guess producers allowed the reflex of crowd in the mirror to give the impression that the virtual artist is surrounded by the public

quote:

We don't even know if this is 'live' in the sense of whether or not she is running a pre-programmed routine.

The routine is pre-programed. One interesting thing is that her voice is synthetized (there's nobody singing in the background) but this is done with a program that handles samples. Nevertheless an impressive achievement.

[quote]
The odd thing for me with Rei Toei, was that she had any AI at all. When it comes to media idols, intelligence is not something the industry seems to want in the human versions.
[/qoute]

Isn't it all about "pos-modernity" (the mind regarded as an inconvenient appendix to the being)?
 
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I remember seeing a spot on Discovery Channel about Yamaha's Vocaloid program, that was designed for this type of thing. This was about 10-15 years ago. It was similar to how MIDI sound cards worked, but was apparently more suited to Japanese than English, due to the amount of sounds used in the language. I don't know/remember if it was suitable for natural sounding speech, though or if the singing was easier to replicate.

This stuck in my head because around the same time they featured a program by Lycos (remember them?) that was trying to have a go at the Turing test. It was a chat-type program that you could go and try out. My young optimistic mind was putting Vocaloid + Lycos AI chat together in my head and getting very excited.

Until I tried the AI chat program. Apparently they spent more time on an algorithm for typing/typos than the actual conversation logic. It broke (repeated a pre-programmed response) pretty quickly under my curiosity, and I haven't really thought about it again until now.
 
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There was a segment about Hatsune Miku last month at Fantástico (program by Globo TV). They showed people "composing" for her. Apple program. Basically you have ways of entering lyrics, melody and then you can fiddle with things until synthesized stuff is as you want it to be...

The program relies on sampled things & frequency generated stuff. Wonder how far you can go with this program if you want natural voice (like her singing "bossa nova").
 
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