Gibsonian

Neuromarketing.



quote:
On the first floor of an unassuming terrace above a row of shops in Hawthorn, eight men and women are gathered. They have been recruited at random by an agency and are being paid about $65 each for the evening to wear plastic headsets that look a little like shower caps, and virtual reality-style visors over their eyes.

There are felt-tip sensors inside the bathing caps to measure the electrical activity in each person's brain. The lights go down, a screen comes up, and a show comes on. But the real show is inside these people's minds: advertisers and television networks want to know what makes this audience pay attention, what engages them and how much their memory will encode for the longer term.

Perhaps even more importantly, they also want to know the audience's emotional response: activity in a complex network of cortical and sub-cortical regions - particularly in the right side of the brain, often ascribed as the creative and emotional side compared to the rational, systemising left side - indicate both emotional intensity (how emotionally energised someone becomes) and emotional valence (the motivational state created by the emotion).

Welcome to the age of neuromarketing.
William Gibson's fiction comes to life with dark clouds
quote:
Does the idea of the military and private corporations having secured shared networks off the Internet grid sound disturbingly familiar? Anyone who's read William Gibson's novels would think so, right down to his description of "black ice" for the security surrounding the walled-off corporate areas online. Do we want corporations banding together to form alliances that can't be seen by any customers, competitors, or government regulators? Should we be concerned about the potential for the very criminals everyone is determined to avoid using the same technology themselves, moving on to set up another dark cloud without ever being detected?

Cohen's dark clouds could be used for everything from a seemingly innocuous defense from online attacks to more insidious uses that could violate laws, including customer privacy. He poses the question anyone should ask when confronted with the idea of such a weapon: "What are the legal ramifications, and do they out weight the need to protect ourselves from criminals who can and will use these tactics against us?" Gibson's novels may be more on target for a vision of our future than we ever imagined.
am i missing something with that article?
the basic idea is that companies/governments might want to establish data networks that were private? that aren't accesible to the outside? surely thats basic security? surely thats exactly the kind of thing the UK government should be doing instead of losing millions of records every couple of months?

sure, if data security was being used by bad people it would let them do bad things. but isn't that already happening?
quote:
Originally posted by Mr.Push:
sure, if data security was being used by bad people it would let them do bad things. but isn't that already happening?
Well, yeah.

I think the Gibson reference is because he's been touching on dark clould/black ice, data haven themes since, well, the begining of his cyberpunk writing. Count Zero has always been a personal favorite of mine in that regard. His work from then still has cultural/media influence almost 30 years later.

Amazing.

Long live the King!
quote:
Originally posted by Mean Old Man:
A post by the mortally quotable Domitella, over at the Gaiman Board, caught my eye. (I believe she's on staff at a museum in the England.)
We have a great exhibition where they had obviously put a lot of thought into the content of some audio pieces listenend to through telephones. Only they are rotary dial telephones and none of the children know how to use them


I was thinking about this just recently, after helping a colleague with a Mozilla Firefox 3.0 issue. This software is morphing very quickly, in the same way that Google chrome is creating a new paradigm for browsing.

If you don't keep abreast of the technology, you'll find yourself with apps you don't know how to use.
quote:
Originally posted by Black Jacque:
quote:
Originally posted by Mean Old Man:
A post by the mortally quotable Domitella, over at the Gaiman Board, caught my eye. (I believe she's on staff at a museum in the England.)
We have a great exhibition where they had obviously put a lot of thought into the content of some audio pieces listenend to through telephones. Only they are rotary dial telephones and none of the children know how to use them


I was thinking about this just recently, after helping a colleague with a Mozilla Firefox 3.0 issue. This software is morphing very quickly, in the same way that Google chrome is creating a new paradigm for browsing.

If you don't keep abreast of the technology, you'll find yourself with apps you don't know how to use.


On the apps; that's silly. If you don't know how to use an app, read a relevant site and you'll be up to speed in a matter of minutes.

On the old school phone... that is not in any way remarkable. Touch tone phones have been the norm for, what, 15 years or something? Even though the rotary dial phones are easy to use, they're obsolete. I have no problems imagining that the average kid is puzzled by its operation.
I miss rotary dials.

And I'm definitely not the only one.

Whenever I talk about it with my cousins and brothers, we all fondly remember the sound and the touch...

We even salvaged a few of those, but they're not compatible with our current phone system.
Adapters are way too expensive. Building our own is beyond our current skills.
The dial may have gone but it's left a few echoes.

Emergency numbers were originally chosen to be difficult to dial on a rotary; 999 here in the UK and 911 most places elsewhere. I assume that, because it took an age to dial 999, 911 was selected because if, say, you were on fire you'd really appreciate that 20 seconds that you saved.

The problem here now is that 999 is one of the easiest numbers to accidentally 'dial' on a push-button - emergency operators probably spend a lot of their time listening to the inside of people's pockets and handbags.

Hence now there's a low-key plan to phase in 911 (which has worked as the emergency number for a few years now). 999 is, however, engraved into the culture to a considerable depth so we may never be able to completely shut it down.

BTW electromechanical telephone exchanges were originally invented by a funeral director to stop operators stealing his business.
quote:
Originally posted by IndividualFrog:
Rotary phones are great, but I'd really like to be able to pick up my two-piece phone and say, "Operator, give me Ruben 642!"


I'd rather my phone kept track of who I've called and when and then randomly dial people, after referencing my calendar of course, in order to force me to maintain social connections with people I forget to call regularly.

"Have you talked to your mother lately? No? Well, I happen to have her on the other line, shall I transfer her over to you?"

How'd that be for Gibsonian?
Mapping a Connected World
quote:
I'm looking forward to the BBC's new project, "The Box". The folks at the Beeb have started a project with shipping line NYK designed to allow readers to track the movements of a single container over the course of a year. The container has been painted with a BBC URL and fitted with a GPS transponder, but otherwise will function as an ordinary container, carrying loads from one port to another. Its voyage will be visualized on a web map, giving viewers a sense for the vagaries of international trade. (Depending on whether BBC stacks the deck or not, this could also be a stunningly boring voyage, if the container simply cycles between Southhampton and Bruges.)

BBC says that the project was inspired by Marc Levinson's excellent book, The Box. (My review of the book is here.) It could just have easily been inspired by William Gibson's newest novel, Spook Country, which centers on the movements of a specific Maersk shipping container around the world. (Not his strongest recent book, but includes some excellent port scenes, so worthwhile for containerphiles.) Or by Brian Cudahy's "Box Boats", a useful complement to Levinson's epic, focusing more on the evolution of ships and shipping lines and less on the containers themselves.

One of the goals of the BBC project is likely to help viewers visualize the complex networks that characterize our global world.
quote:
Originally posted by BK/DK:
The dial may have gone but it's left a few echoes.

Emergency numbers were originally chosen to be difficult to dial on a rotary; 999 here in the UK and 911 most places elsewhere. I assume that, because it took an age to dial 999, 911 was selected because if, say, you were on fire you'd really appreciate that 20 seconds that you saved.



The emergency number here is 000, probably for the same reason.

But kids are more familiar with 911, which can be problematic in an emergency. Ain´t globalisation great?
In France, it was :
17 : police
18 : fire brigade

I think 16 was added later for medical emergences.

Now, the funny part is : cellphones.
I have no idea if these numbers work on mobile phones.
I have asked people, and nobody was sure either.

I guess I'll find out when I really need it.
And I'll probably regret not having known it sooner.
quote:
Originally posted by ArkanGL:
In France, it was :
17 : police
18 : fire brigade

I think 16 was added later for medical emergences.

Now, the funny part is : cellphones.
I have no idea if these numbers work on mobile phones.
I have asked people, and nobody was sure either.

I guess I'll find out when I really need it.
And I'll probably regret not having known it sooner.


After a little research it seems that 112 (presumably as it's the quickest 3 digits to non-accidentally dial on a rotary) is the standard GSM emergency number and works anywhere, even from a SIM-less, locked phone.

It's also the pan-EU number and as such is official here in the UK, although I never knew. It's in my forebrain now but 999 is tattooed deep into my cerebellum so I have the feeling that that's what my fingers will do if I ever need it.

I'm now not sure whether 911 works here or not but, as Gromit points out, years of global exposure to US culture suggests that it ought to.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1-1-2

I remember we were taught how to rotary-dial 999 in the dark when I was a cub scout.
It's 119 in Japan. Despite what people might tell you, the operators cannot understand English at all. And it is difficult to speak Japanese when you are in the middle of some crisis. I recommend practicing what to say out loud every so often if you are living in a country whose language you are not fluent in.
quote:
Originally posted by BK/DK:
I remember we were taught how to rotary-dial 999 in the dark when I was a cub scout.


Damn useless if the rotary dial is broken.

Should have taught you to dial 999 by hitting the cradle at the right interval.
quote:
Originally posted by IndividualFrog:
Rotary phones are great, but I'd really like to be able to pick up my two-piece phone and say, "Operator, give me Ruben 642!"


We had rotary as a kid.

I like the old heavy plastic with metal base and bell. Much more satisfying to clobber somebody with that than a blackberry.

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