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The Axe Thread

Well, despite sincere efforts to do so, Splitcoil and I didn't *quite* manage to derail TheMythod's 'call to arms' thread into a discussion of guitars. Guitars are very important (Mars Needs Guitars?), though, so I think they need their own thread. I took a photo of my Quest Atak 5 to post, but then couldn't get onto the relevant computer to upload it, so that will have to happen later. Here's a photo of an Iceman like I used to own, though:



Edit: My love affair with rosewood fingerboards (reflected in the purple machine I posted in the other thread) began with this guitar.
 
nice iceman
I've a 68 or so SG with the batman pickguard and 2 black soap bar pickups. It's a much better guitar than I am a player. Also have an Alembic Explorer bass. It too is better than I am

Things are more like they are now than ever before.
 
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Tom Morello being an innovator.
Is Les Claypool too insane to be considered in the "Bass Players Hall of Fame"?
Dave(Matthews) stop whining dude.

I want to leap out of this personality, and then...sit apart from the leaping/ I've lived too long where I can be reached.
 
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...and Buckethead as an innovator, and...

Nope, Les is The Man! Who else would be in that hall though? :P Maybe Jaco Pastorius. Maybe even Billy Sheehan, in a totally different way. Geddy Lee? Gimme a break!

Edit: Oi, basses are not *real* guitars: how dare you attempt a counter-derail! Wink
 
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How 'bout Stan Clark, or perhaps Victor wooten(wrong spelling)?

I want to leap out of this personality, and then...sit apart from the leaping/ I've lived too long where I can be reached.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by TheMythod:
How 'bout Stan Clark, or perhaps Victor wooten(wrong spelling)?



I'd put in a vote for John Entwistle

Things are more like they are now than ever before.
 
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Mike Watt, mad monk of the thud staff.

And I like my 1999 Les Paul Studio: economical rock. And my American P-Bass of unknown vintage. Anyone know how to date Fenders?
 
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It's working.
How has nobody even mentioned Flea?

I want to leap out of this personality, and then...sit apart from the leaping/ I've lived too long where I can be reached.
 
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The guitar/bass combo in Tool sounds like no-one else (even the various imitators) - and I don't even know their names.

Now that I'm in North America, and no longer a student, a Les Paul is definitely on my shopping list.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Bravus:

Nope, Les is The Man! Who else would be in that hall though? Maybe Jaco Pastorius. Maybe even Billy Sheehan, in a totally different way. Geddy Lee? Gimme a break!


Not familiar with the oeuvre of Claypool, but I did see Pastorius in concert many years ago. What a supremely talented, demented freak he was. And he could sing, too. The encore was a swamp blues number.

Billy Sheehan- I clearly recall the sound of his bass crushing everything else during a live (Knebworth? Live Aid?) rendition of "Tie-Died on the Highway". It was brainless riffing, but it was goooood.

Entwhistle is the four-string Jesus, of course. As for the younger bassists, I like Tim Commerford.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by anarchocyclist:
And I like my 1999 Les Paul Studio: economical rock. And my American P-Bass of unknown vintage. Anyone know how to date Fenders?


Easy! Post the first 4 characters of the serial number and I'll date it for you. The basic rule for dating American Fenders from at least the 70's onward is: the first letter is an abbrev. for the decade (S=seventies, E=eighties, N=nineties, Z=2000's). the first digit is within one year of the ones place of the production year, e.g., my '77 tele deluxe's S/N starts S77). There's a little overlap with the digit place, so for instance it is possible that my tele is a '78. Rules for Mexican and Japanese Fenders are different.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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About five years ago I swapped a primo Kramer (Original Floyd Rose trem, Seymore Duncan Twin Humbuck-bright turquoise) for a prototype feedback proof acoustic hand built by my neighbour Mad Steve Ackworth. This bloke worked with Status Quo in the 70's as guitar tech and has built guitars for Frampton and The Stones. He met Bowie in the late sixties and thinks "Starman" was written about him..! A year after getting this beauty of a guitar (table made of old kitchen worksurface, noise active bracing, unvarnished neck- body like Dolly Parton) Steve went a bit off the rails and I last heard he was somewhere in Wales getting his shit together. As far as I know he hasn't made any other instuments since. Great acoustic that you can crank up on stage and it won't squeal like a stuck pig.
Cant find a photo of it yet and my brother has it at the moment-and he's doing backing vocals on Arthur Brown's new album- I hope to see it again someday.
 
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quote:
Originally posted by anarchocyclist:
Mike Watt, mad monk of the thud staff.




That's a coincidence, I was just coding to BallHog or Tugboat? this morning. I saw fireHose 5 or 6 times back in the day when I lived in SoCal. He's up there in the Bass Player Pantheon.

Things are more like they are now than ever before.
 
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Bravus, you're the man! I have no webspace, so I can't upload pics. My current arsenal of guitars includes:

Electric:
'77 (or '78) Fender Telecaster Deluxe, modded with a Schecter trem-bridge.

'00 Gibson Les Paul Junior Special, currently my favorite axe--just a marvelous piece of wood that sustains forever.

'95 Epiphone Casino, a great primitive rock guitar. A REAL hollow-body with p-90's and pounds of chrome. Can anyone say feedback?

~'99 or '00 Epiphone LP Classic 12-string, easily the most Freudian guitar you can own. Big honkin' chunk of wood with a headstock the size of North Dakota. I love Korean Epiphones; fantastic bang for the buck.

Acoustic (not counting me wife's guitars):
'98 Taylor 414CE, a marvelous little guitar, especially for recording. Tremendously versatile and very very well-balanced tone--if you play with the same attack, etc., no matter what note you play up and down the neck, it all comes out at the same volume. No dreadnought woof-out.

'02 Martin HD-28V. Massive dreadnought woof-out, and it's a good thing. SOmetimes you want to be subtle, sometimes you want to be able to knock down a wall with an E-string like a cannon. This guitar is for the latter situation.

'?? Alvarez Silver Anniversary 6-string, non-cutaway version. I will always love this guitar and can't see myself getting rid of it. It's the most convincing copy of a round-shouldered J45 that I've ever seen. Marvelous woody, mellow tone. It's been beat up pretty soundly, but still plays like a champ.

Bass:
'02 Fender P-Bass Standard. Of the Mexican variety, and another wonderful value. It took 3 days of driving around testing these babies out until I found one that was perfect. And now it's a kick-ass, beautiful bass with great tone and a lifetime guarantee for less than $400. You can't beat that with a stick. FABULOUS tone. Plus, the kids at the store screwed up and gave me all the case candy that would normally go with a $2000 Amer. Deluxe Jazz Bass. Hee hee! Can you say bonus?

Amps:
I have a multitude of amps right now, but the biggie is a Fender Hot Rod Deluxe. WAY too damned loud for anything other than gigging, tho. I'm still looking for a satisfactory practice rig. Now that I'm moving to an apartment, I'll likely have to switch over to a digital modeler of some kind. Ack.


Damn! I have too many guitars! BTW, nice Hoodoos reference, Bravus! They're the first guitar band I ever fell in love with. Before that, it was all R&B for me.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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ahh, wooten. "You Can't Hold No Groove if You Ain't Got No Pocket!" was the put down of choice at my high school.
I, umm....I play the mandolin. a Fender, 2001.

....I'm such a hillbilly.

live something, die whatever.
 
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Splitcoil wrote:
quote:
Damn! I have too many guitars!

Nono, the phrases 'too many' and 'guitars' are automatically oxymoronic!

I have had up to 5 at a time - a classical (bought for about 50 bucks over 20 years ago and has had a broken neck, but still a very nice sound and getting warmer as it ages), the Atak (watch this space), the Iceman (which I already regret selling but I was super-broke), an old nylon string that I ruined by putting steel strings on it and an Ibanez fake of a Rickenbacker bass that I completely ruined by turning it into some sort of Gene Simmons monster beast!

I also owned the world's shittiest SG copy, with a whammy that would send it out of tune in 15 seconds *even if you didn't touch it*, and a Fender Jaguar, which I regret selling even more.

I've mainly had Peavey amps over the years, mainly because I was an 80s metal monster and their transistor crunch worked for that. I just have the classical and the Atak now, but want a really nice steel string acoustic-electric and a Les Paul. What I'd like now is a really tasty amp with dual 10s and chorus etc that I can play all of the above (except the classical) through, and some effects pedals. I want to play with infinite sustain: maybe, like Reeves Gabrels, I need a vibrator!
 
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Playing mandolin does not mean you're a hillbilly. It means you have tiiiiiiiny little hands, like a little girl.

I had a mandolin for a couple years, a Zen-On Suwaneena, Japanese electric mandolin from the '60's. I love crazy old japanese instruments. I played for awhile, but I have HUGE hands. Freakishly long fingers. I just couldn't get comfortable on that little thing, so I traded it off on a guitar deal.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Bravus:
Nono, the phrases 'too many' and 'guitars' are automatically oxymoronic!


As many as I have, I'm still lusting for a strat (the Fender Jimmy Vaughan signature model is SO tasty), an SG (who doesn't lust for an SG?), a custom hardtail Jazzmaster built from USA Custom and Warmoth parts (I've got it all planned out; I just need an extra $1000 and a frontal lobotomy), and a Rickenbacker Dakota. My bank account is lucky that I'm a disciplined man.
quote:

I have had up to 5 at a time


lightweight! Big Grin
quote:
- a classical (bought for about 50 bucks over 20 years ago and has had a broken neck, but still a very nice sound and getting warmer as it ages), the Atak (watch this space), the Iceman (which I already regret selling but I was super-broke), an old nylon string that I ruined by putting steel strings on it and an Ibanez fake of a Rickenbacker bass that I completely ruined by turning it into some sort of Gene Simmons monster beast!


My wife has an early-70's Guild Classical that she got from her uncle. It literally has the tone of a piano, a really warm sound. It's coming apart at the seams, though. The uncle didn't take proper care of it.

I have no idea what an Atak even is. Never heard of it, and I'm a serious guitar geek. Judging from your other choices in gear, I figure it's a super-strat metal machine of some kind... probably with a strangely sculpted alder or basswood body with pointy projections and either dual humbuckers or a H-S-H configuration... at least a 15" board radius... am I warm?
quote:

I also owned the world's shittiest SG copy, with a whammy that would send it out of tune in 15 seconds *even if you didn't touch it*, and a Fender Jaguar, which I regret selling even more.


You sold your Jag?!?!?!? Did you have a drug habit to feed or something?
quote:

I've mainly had Peavey amps over the years, mainly because I was an 80s metal monster and their transistor crunch worked for that. I just have the classical and the Atak now, but want a really nice steel string acoustic-electric and a Les Paul. What I'd like now is a really tasty amp with dual 10s and chorus etc that I can play all of the above (except the classical) through, and some effects pedals. I want to play with infinite sustain: maybe, like Reeves Gabrels, I need a vibrator!


Being in Canada, you're in a wonderful position to pick up a nice acoustic. Seagulls are terrific values. I own one that I keep at a relative's house in Texas, so I can play when I'm down there in hell, errrr, I mean Texas. If you've got the scratch, I can't recommend many guitars more strongly than a Larrivee L-body. Play one. You will desire it.

I too owned an Ibanez "lawsuit" bass: mine was a Black Beauty Les Paul 4-string bass. Probably the most beautiful guitar I've ever owned. It was a back-breaker, though. I had to trade it. Paid $200 for it, got $375 trade-in for it. I still regret getting rid of it, though. Really beautiful guit.

And if you want infinite sustain, there's no need to resort to sex toys. Pick up a Fernandes Sustainer. If you're a metal guy you'll probably dig it anyway. Fernandes guits are pretty good values, they're just not up my alley.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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I own 3 guitars.

I still own the guitar I got for my 15th birthday, a cheap Peavey Falcon 1 strat. Not an awesome guitar, but it serves its purpose.

I have another crappy nylon acoustic that I have no need for - some friend of my parents gave it to me because they heard i played guitar, and, well you don't turn down a free instrument. It has a wide ass fret board.

My favourite guitar is my Takamine EC132SC.

Identical to this one, as far as I can tell, although it's listed as the CD132SC...



A really beautiful sound. I love it.

---
Fighting causes injury
 
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That site is awesome... who knows how that would sound though. Smile

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Fighting causes injury
 
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I WANT one of those Takamine Classicals! I want one so much I'm selling a Les Paul Personal I've had for 32 years!

I'm going to put some kind of pick guard on the Takamine and use a flat pick for jazz. That may sound odd, but I tried it on an old nylon-string classical I had and the sound was SO nice! Especially playing fast, like some McLaughlin licks. Heard the album, FRIDAY NIGHT IN SAN FRANSICO? -- DiMeola, McLaughlin, DeLucia? Like that. Plus, I started playing the sax part from old Brubeck tunes on nylon strings accompanied only by a bass ... GOOD!

That and Django, of course.
 
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Oh... and I bought an old trombone, too.

Wait... this is the AXE thread!

Sorry!
 
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quote:
Originally posted by anarchocyclist:
Mike Watt, mad monk of the thud staff.

And I like my 1999 Les Paul Studio: economical rock. And my American P-Bass of unknown vintage. Anyone know how to date Fenders?


Good choice on the Studio, Anarcho. I have thought of picking one up from time to time, considering that they are a good value. However, too many other objects of lust, errr, I mean, guitars, keep getting in the way.

Oddly, though I love playing bass I have no bass heroes except for guys in local bands. Van Conner (of the Screaming Trees) might register as a great unsung bassist in my book.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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These guits are similar to mine, tho without the various upgrades/mods:
The Jr. Special:


The tele:


The Casino:


The Martin, almost:


The Taylor:


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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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My Les Paul is on eBay (tears well up in Trogdor's eyes). If you do a search on eBay for "Les Paul Personal", mine's the one (of two right now) without the friggen Bigsby... which the guy says is factory... but I just don't see how that can be true.
 
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You're a madman, Troggie! You're totally low-balling the price! Jack up the Buy it Now, man! You're selling a 30-year-old, one-owner, rare model of an LP for $1100?!?!?!? Are you insane, or just charitable?

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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Well... truthfully... that's about what it's worth. With the laquer checking, I doubt I get more than $1000.00

Rockers don't like them because they refuse to distort and weigh a damned TON! Even with a 4" strap, you stand with one of these through a 45 minute set and you got you some back problems.

I love the guitar... just don't use it. Did you see the one with the Bigsby? Guy says its factory! No fucking way Gibson would have put a Bigsby on a LPP!
 
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Splitcoil wrote:
quote:
I have no webspace, so I can't upload pics.


You don't need your own site - sign up for one of the free online photo galleries such as Fotopic. You can direct link to anything you upload.

Oh - I know nothing about guitars but I'm enjoying this thread. Carry on!
 
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quote:
Originally posted by Trogdor:
Well... truthfully... that's about what it's worth. With the laquer checking, I doubt I get more than $1000.00

Rockers don't like them because they refuse to distort and weigh a damned TON! Even with a 4" strap, you stand with one of these through a 45 minute set and you got you some back problems.

I love the guitar... just don't use it. Did you see the one with the Bigsby? Guy says its factory! No fucking way Gibson would have put a Bigsby on a LPP!


Actually, according to the Gruhn Guide, (I just looked it up), the Personal was only built from 69-70, and it says that a Bigsby was optional. So he may be telling the truth. Of course, 34 years later, there's no way of telling whether it was factory-installed. According to Gruhn, the Personal and Professional were replaced by the Recording in 1971.

I hate it when I think I know something, only to look it up and find out I was wrong.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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Yeah... come to think of it, all the LPPs came with a microphone input on the top too. That's as bad as the Bigsby or worse! It's like putting an automatic umbrella on a bycicle!

The REALLY high priced old Les Pauls are the Customs and Standards and such... successful models. The Personal was decidedly unsuccessful. The very best craftsmanship Gibson ever had with pickups that absolutely refused to growl. Try selling that in 1970! Rockers would try my axe and fall in love with the way it played, but when they plugged it in to an amp and didn't have the distortion to hide their sloppy chord changes... they ran away.
 
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I've got an Ovation Custom Balladeer too (steel string acoustic). Plays nice. I hate it! Once you get used to those nylon strings and the wider neck, everything else sucks. My Ovation is a damned folk singer guitar owned by a guy who thinks folk singers should be put in concentration camps.
 
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Splitcoil wrote:
quote:
Judging from your other choices in gear, I figure it's a super-strat metal machine of some kind... probably with a strangely sculpted alder or basswood body with pointy projections and either dual humbuckers or a H-S-H configuration... at least a 15" board radius... am I warm?

Heh, psychically smokin', I'd say! Here it is:



Apropos of your nickname, it has a coil splitter - lift the tone pot and turn the humbucker into a single-coil... Not sure of the neck radius, but what you said sounds pretty plausible. The body is really light wood, which means it doesn't sustain worth a damn, but can be played fairly satisfactorily unplugged.
 
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Also, lately I've been cutting it up something chronic with a little beauty I picked up from a second hand store. I don't think they knew what they were letting go when I walked out of the store.



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Fighting causes injury
 
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Also, I can't believe I was the first one to use that gag.

Something to do with stooping low, i'm sure.

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Fighting causes injury
 
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Wow, that's an unusual guitar. Where the heck was it built? I'm tempted to say it's Japanese. Maple fretboard on a metal guitar is odd in the extreme... from the headstock, knobs and brass saddles, I'd say it's late-70's construction, but body shapes like that were pretty rare then. Early to mid-80's? If it's Asian, then the light weight is probably due to the body being basswood. That was pretty prevalent through the 80's and 90's, less so now. They (mostly the Japanese) used it a lot where Americans would use alder instead. Now a lot of Asian guitars are using agathis, alder or chestnut. Like you say, not much sustain but very nice light weight. I had a bass that was very appropriately made of basswood. It also dents and dings easily, compared to other guitar woods. The coil tap is another unusual feature for a 70's/80's guitar. Very intriguing. What do you know about its origins? EDIT: A-ha, just noticed the bullet truss rod, too. Late-70's, early-80's for certain! You've got an early shredding machine there, Bravus.

Edit: naturally, I was referring to Bravus' post, not Kuchen's. But while I'm here: Hmmm, Kuchen, do you think that's made of iron, or is it aluminum? And how do you like the handle radius?

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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Shred on!

Mind you, when I went a-googling for 'battle axe', this was about the 4th entry:

http://www.gearpreview.com/music/dj/bataxe.html

Do I *really* want to know what a 'hamster switch' is?

Edit1: Although it's made by Peavey, who always made my guitar amps, I think it's DJing equipment...

Edit2: And this is just damn scary: http://www.childrenofyahweh.com/Comparet/battle_axe.htm
 
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The hamster switch is usually flicked at the end of a set when the crowd really hasn't responded to your outpouring of musical juice.

Hit the hamster switch and release a horde of hamsters onto your ungrateful fans.

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Fighting causes injury
 
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Found this.

Apparently Japanese, made by Vantage.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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Not as much fun as the fictional possibilities, and quite indecipherable to me still, but EMP says it means this.

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"When the fight gets too big, they don't bother with coffins." -- the coffin-maker, YOJIMBO
 
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Ah, cool! Wonder why they call it a 'V', when the headstock definitely says '5' on both mine and theirs? Yeah, I saw a review from another guy elsewhere on the net, who loved the one he'd had years ago. It's a neat (and apparently rare) little machine, albeit a cheapy.

Edit: Did those images strike you as somehow pornographic, or is it just me?
 
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